::: This Guerilla Artist Leaves a Swarming Trail of Blue Behind Her :::

Tasha Lewis is a talented guerilla artist or street artist who’s spent the last month working on her most recent project, “The Butterfly Swarm.” Basically, she’s been traveling the country to install hundreds of ephemeral butterflies onto metal objects in public urban spaces. Her work has been spotted throughout various cities of her home state of Indiana, as well as Chicago and throughout cities of  Pennsylvania. Continue reading

Interactive Street Art: Space Invaders on the Streets of Manchester

Filthy Luker teams up with Red Stripe to create this fun and exciting street art project of Space Invaders. He’s taken normal elements seen everyday on the streets (street furniture, road signs, construction barriers) and with some behind-the-scenes electronic rigs, he’s been able to successfully create a fully interactive experience – where the people of Manchester can – with the press of a button – play Space Invaders on the streets with each other. The orange construction barriers each look like a Space Invader, so when someone presses the button, the lights (behind the objects) display a gigantic game on the side of this building in the city. So much fun!!!!!

Japanese Posters and Magazine Covers from the 1920’s and 30’s

From a graphic designer’s point of view, these selected pieces really stand out – not only compositionally, but in the style, the execution, the precision, placement of elements, eye flow, use of color, juxtaposition, foreshadowing, perspective, typography and all of the other buzz words you can throw in there. They all work so well and serve as exemplary pieces, together to represent this collection, but also each stands out uniquely in their own way.

What I love in seeing examples from artists this era is the pure artisanship on display. With a ticking clock in today’s design world, I feel the true mastery of art and technique has gotten lost in the concept of time. It’s become more about getting done what you can in the time allotted, rather than doing your best in however long that takes. Quantity first – and as a result, quality suffers. Whereas back then, it was more important to take time to master the art of using pen and ink on paper, as you can see in their various styles of illustration in each of these pieces. You were known by the work attached to your name. That meant something in order to be distinguished as an artist – regardless of where you lived in the world. However, the Japanese took honor and their work to a much more serious level.

From a historical point of view, they represent best Japan at that time – the influences of the war, the changes in political views and social changes that were moving through the nation. These also represent some of the European influences with hints of Cubism, Constructivism and Surrealism in these works.  These ads, posters and magazine covers mark the beginning of when communication design emerged in Japan. Some people referred to these works as “city art” with hopes of appealing to urban consumers through avant-garde visuals, trendy at that time with styles initiated in the West. The significance around these pieces as a whole created an awareness of the larger world, and therefore, they established many of the principles of early graphic design in Japan.

 

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From the book of Modernism on Paper: Japanese Graphic Design of the 1920s-30s by Naomichi Kawabata

 

To see more examples, please visit this link here.


This Takes Doodling to a Whole New Level

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Sagaki Keita | Illustrator and Artist from Tokyo

This 28-year-old artist, Sagaki Keita, was born in 1984 and lives and works out of his hometown in Tokyo. His intensely layered pen and ink illustrations consist of millions of expressive doodles that are so freely released on paper – yet he carries with each a pure intent of creating a fine art piece when complete.  The numerous myriad of these playful characters which are comprised of individual pen strokes and overlapping lines… these whimsical elements fill in the gaps or they are layered on top of each other to in the end make up shading on a cheekbone or create the shadows of muscle tones. Just absolutely brilliant – the technique! To see more of his work, click here.

Street Art Series #3 ::: Rome Street Artists ::: Invader, Street and Lex, Ludo

Last April, I remember seeing sooo many of Invader’s “space invaders” all over the city of Paris, where I got engaged a year ago. Fast-forward about a year, and this May, I will be officially out of the “single” market and happily entering a new chapter, as my new hubby and I will be heading to Rome to celebrate!

Although I love surprises, I want to purposefully try to seek out these pieces during our trip. It’ll be like a treasure hunt – with the only treasure will only exist in the digital photograph or video form. After researching all of the street art that’s been incorporated through Italy, I wanted to showcase a few that have expressed themselves brilliantly throughout Rome. Here are some of the pieces I hope to see in person:

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Here are more about these artists and their work:

INVADER

STEN AND LEX

LUDO


Street Art Series #2 ::: Slinkachu ::: A Tiny Street Art Collection (1 of 3)

Street Art Series #2 ::: Slinkachu ::: A Tiny Street Art Collection (1 of 3)

Slinkachu is a is a British street artist and photographer who received a ton of notoriety on the scene for his “Little People,” which consist of installations of these tiny scenes that date back to 2006 at various locations through the streets of London. His art has been featured in numerous exhibitions in London and Norway. In his own words, this is how he describes his work, where he came up with the concept and why…

My ‘Little People Project’ started in 2006. It involves the remodelling and painting of miniature model train set characters, which I then place and leave on the street. It is both a street art installation project and a photography project. The street-based side of my work plays with the notion of surprise and I aim to encourage city-dwellers to be more aware of their surroundings. The scenes I set up, more evident through the photography, and the titles I give these scenes aim to reflect the loneliness and melancholy of living in a big city, almost being lost and overwhelmed. But underneath this, there is always some humour. I want people to be able to empathise with the tiny people in my works.

In the business of life, we are all guilty of coasting through life, getting caught up in our own little worlds. These “little worlds” of his put everything in perspective. Plus, they’re so perfectly constructed that the composition in each shot just tells its own story. If I’m ever walking the streets in London, I will be sure to keep an eye out for one of these scenes. Just a brilliant concept that’s executed so strategically… LOVE his work!