This Takes Doodling to a Whole New Level

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Sagaki Keita | Illustrator and Artist from Tokyo

This 28-year-old artist, Sagaki Keita, was born in 1984 and lives and works out of his hometown in Tokyo. His intensely layered pen and ink illustrations consist of millions of expressive doodles that are so freely released on paper – yet he carries with each a pure intent of creating a fine art piece when complete.  The numerous myriad of these playful characters which are comprised of individual pen strokes and overlapping lines… these whimsical elements fill in the gaps or they are layered on top of each other to in the end make up shading on a cheekbone or create the shadows of muscle tones. Just absolutely brilliant – the technique! To see more of his work, click here.

Showcasing Each Letterform in 3D ::: Architypo ::: The Final Alphabet

Johnson Banks is the firm that took on this request from a suggestion made from their client, Ravensbourne. The request was to see if they’d take their 3D prototyping skills to the next level and create a 3D expression of the current alphabet. Each letterform is showcased in a different expression of itself – repeated, stacked, rotated, scaled, skewed, while still maintaining parts of its recognizable shape. Not only that, but each font or typeface they used – whether they chose to use the lowercase or uppercase letterform – each detail in these 3D constructions was carefully considered and reflected in the description as well. This is Arkitypo: The Final Alphabet.

Take for instance the letter “H” for a moment…

The Letter H | Helvetica

Helvetica
Originally designed in 1957 as Neue Haas Grotesk, its 1960 version was renamed Helvetica. Given that its name was based on ‘Helvetia’ (Latin for Switzerland) it was no surprise that it became the vanguard of the Swiss style, and the typeface of choice for corporations across the world for the last fifty years.

Now, having read that – look again at their approach. They incorporated the letterform that’s made up of all of these recognized names who use “Helvetica” as their chosen typeface for branding the company. (Nestle, Blaupunkt, Basf, Target, Kawasaki and more…)

Let’s look at the letter “C” now…

The Letter C | Courier

Courier
Courier was originally commissioned for 1950s IBM typewriters, but soon became the standard font throughout the then-emerging industry. As a nod to the torturous days of jammed machinery, this ‘C’ is built from a small forest of typewriter keys.

This being a little more literal in its translation is still quite clever in its expression. The execution of these typewriter keys, overlapping, stacked, rotated… they create interesting angles and shadows upon one another. They mimic the true shape of the letter, while tying back to the history of the font. Impressive interpretation!

Here’s what they created for the letter “I”

The Letter I | Industria

Industria
Originally designed for The Face in 1984 by Neville Brody, Industria was released publically as a font in 1989. It has a mechanical structure of straight strokes, rounded corners and square inner spaces that refer back to Art Deco and design pioneers such as Ladislav Sutnar.

This could be a sculpture I’d feature in my living room! To take a letter, observe its rigid form  and then create a piece that not only adds movement… this piece also ties back to its Art Deco movement with this ultra thin case used in this industrial interpretation.

The result can be seen in this video – which shows 360 degree renders of each letter sculpture.

Unbelievable ::: 3D freehand illustration, etched by lasers in glass cubes

“Exiting the realm of flat depiction and stretching the limits between sculpting and graphic arts by creating three dimensional freehand drawings.”  ~ Robin Kosnas has really gone into a new dimension, literally. She has created these amazing and unbelievably detailed sculptures from her 3D freehand illustrations. Apparently, the lasers engrave and etch the detail into these glass cubes, and what it creates are these incredible pieces. Take a peek at the photos up close to really see the finite precision captured. What a beautiful execution… just brilliant!!!  These were taken from her profile on the Behance Network.

::::: Tutti Frutti Ruti’s Roots :::::

This 26-year old, Ruti Ben Dror, has some amazing work she’s created all through folding paper. I can’t imagine how many paper cuts were attained in making these extraordinary works! Check them out here:

off-the-charts, amazing shadow art

Shadow Art

I don’t even want to know how many hours each of these took to construct these. Ok, well maybe I am a bit curious… about that, and how do you even concept such a piece? I’d imagine it’d be something that just “happens” to appear, as you’re building it? Regardless, it’s pretty freakin’ cool!

Here’s the gallery of other astonishing pieces…

“Slash: Paper Under the Knife” opened last weekend and runs through April 4, 2010. The focus is on paper – how these contemporary artists have used paper as their medium: cutting, tearing, burning, or shredding. The show features 50 artists and a dozen installations made just for the show.  For more info, go here.

 

Theo Jansen’s “strandbeest”

Theo Jansen | Animaris Percipiere “Beach Animals”

Since 1990, Theo started creating these beach animals, these new forms of life, skeletons which are able to walk on the windThe time, the effort, the planning, the sheer number of tubes you have to order for one of these… I can’t even imagine. These kinetic sculptures are designed to move gracefully and beautifully, powered only by the wind currents, which help them walk and move down the beach. His goal is to create these beach animals and release them into the wild, so they can endure the elements among nature and exist in herds.

How you might ask? Watch the video and see for yourself these beautiful “creatures” if you will as they come to life before your eyes. Incredible!!! From his words:

“Self-propelling beach animals like Animaris Percipiere have a stomach . This consists of recycled plastic bottles containing air that can be pumped up to a high pressure by the wind. This is done using a variety of bicycle pump, needless to say of plastic tubing. Several of these little pumps are driven by wings up at the front of the animal that flap in the breeze. It takes a few hours, but then the bottles are full. They contain a supply of potential wind. Take off the cap and the wind will emerge from the bottle at high speed. The trick is to get that untamed wind under control and use it to move the animal. For this, muscles are required. Beach animals have pushing muscles which get longer when told to do so. These consist of a tube containing another that is able to move in and out. There is a rubber ring on the end of the inner tube so that this acts as a piston. When the air runs from the bottles through a small pipe in the tube it pushes the piston outwards and the muscle lengthens. The beach animal’s muscle can best be likened to a bone that gets longer. Muscles can open taps to activate other muscles that open other taps, and so on. This creates control centres that can be compared to brains.”    ~ Theo Jansen

If you’re still curious to find out more, watch the TED film featuring Jansen.